outcome measures were spontaneous preterm birth and small for gestational age infants. Study participants included 80% (n=1992) of women who were non-smokers.

 Smoking Early in Pregnancy is Effective

 According to an article published in the British Medical Journal (2009;338:b1081), a study was performed to compare pregnancy outcomes between women who stopped smoking in early pregnancy and those who either did not smoke in pregnancy or continued to smoke. This prospective cohort study evaluated 2,504 nulliparous women participating in the Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study grouped by maternal smoking status at 15 (±1) week’s gestation. The main % (n=261) who had stopped smoking, and 10% (n=251) who were current smokers. Results showed no differences in rates of spontaneous preterm birth (4%, n=88 v 4%, n=10) or small for gestational age infants (10%, n=195 v 10%, n=27) between non-smokers and stopped smokers. Current smokers had higher rates of spontaneous preterm birth (10%, n=25 v 4%, n=10; P=0.006) and small for gestational age infants (17%, n=42 v 10%, n=27; P=0.03) than stopped smokers. According to the authors, in women who stopped smoking before 15 weeks’ gestation, rates of spontaneous preterm birth and small for gestational age infants did not differ from those in non-smokers, indicating that these severe adverse effects of smoking may be reversible if smoking is stopped early in pregnancy.

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