INFECTIOUS DISEASES

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Dengue Vaccine Shows Promise In Early-Stage Trial

 

Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever for a reason, is prevalent in many tropical and subtropical regions of the world, and is caused by any of four related viruses — DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4. Dengue fever is transmitted to humans by the Aedes mosquito. The World Health Organization estimates that every year, 50 million to 100 million cases of dengue occur worldwide, resulting in 500,000 hospitalizations of patients with severe disease, many of them in children. Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash that is similar to measles. In a small proportion of cases the disease develops into the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever, resulting in bleeding, low levels of blood platelets and blood plasma leakage, or into dengue shock syndrome, where dangerously low blood pressure occurs.

 

Infection with one dengue virus results in immunity to that specific virus but not to the other three. Research shows that the likelihood of severe disease increases when a person is subsequently infected with a different dengue virus. This observation suggests that the ideal dengue vaccine would be tetravalent — that is, protective against all four dengue viruses.

 

According to results from an early-stage clinical trial sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the NIH and published online in the Journal of Infectious Diseases (17 January 2013), a candidate dengue vaccine has been found to be safe and to stimulate a strong immune response in most vaccine recipients.

 

The Phase I clinical trial was launched in July 2010 and led by principal investigator Anna Durbin, M.D., at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. The study tested a single dose of each of four versions of the investigational dengue vaccine TetraVax-DV which was developed in NIAID’s Laboratory of Infectious Diseases. It is a live-attenuated vaccine, which means that the viruses it contains are weakened enough such that they do not cause illness but still can induce an immune response. Each of the four vaccines tested included different mixtures of components designed to protect against all four dengue viruses.

 

The final study analysis included 112 healthy men and women ages 18 to 50 years who had not previously been exposed to dengue or related viruses such as West Nile virus and yellow fever virus.

 

Study participants were randomized into four groups. In each group, 20 volunteers received a single 0.5-milliliter subcutaneous (under the skin) injection of one of the tetravalent candidate vaccine combinations, and eight others received placebo. All were monitored for immediate adverse reactions for at least 30 minutes after vaccination, and subsequently took their body temperatures three times daily for 16 days to check for possible adverse reactions. Participants also received a physical examination every other day up to Study Day 16, and then again on study days 21, 28, 42 and 180, when blood tests were also performed.

 

Results showed that all four candidate vaccine combinations induced antibody responses against each of the dengue viruses. However, one vaccine combination, TV003, appeared to induce the most balanced antibody response against the dengue viruses. A single dose of TV003 resulted in an antibody response to all four dengue viruses in 45% of participants and against three of the four viruses in an additional 45%. Overall, an immune response to at least three viruses was seen in 90% of vaccinees given TV003.

 

All four candidate tetravalent vaccines were found to be safe, and no participants experienced fever or dengue-like illness after vaccination. The most common side effect was a faint rash (in 64% of vaccinees and none of the placebo recipients) consisting of small, non-painful bumps on the arms and torso that resolved within five to seven days. The presence of the rash appeared to correlate with being white and having a stronger immune response to vaccination. Ninety percent of white vaccinees experienced a vaccine-related rash while only 35% of African-American vaccinees developed a rash. Further, 97% of white vaccine recipients (42 of 43) developed antibodies to at least three of the dengue viruses, compared with 60% of African-American vaccine recipients (22 of 37). It is unclear what caused this difference, but previous studies of severe dengue outbreaks in Brazil, Cuba and Haiti suggest that black people may have some inherent protection from dengue infection. Alternatively, unknown factors may have resulted in a weaker antibody response to the vaccine among African-American participants. According to the authors, additional research to evaluate racial differences in dengue infection and antibody response rates to dengue vaccines is needed.

 

TV003’s inexpensive production cost — less than $1 per dose — is critical to its potential use in developing countries. Manufacturers in Brazil, India and Vietnam — countries where dengue is prevalent — have licensed the vaccine technology for production and further evaluation. Phase II trials to evaluate the safety of TV003 and its capacity to create an immune response will begin soon in Brazil and Thailand.

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