New York Named to Top Five Biotech Regions

According to the 2008 Top 5 Regions for Biotech report from FierceBiotech, New York is now included as one of the top regions targeting biotech. New York’s growing cluster is also home to top researching facilities such as Columbia University Medical Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering and Cornell. With $600 million approved for embryonic an adult stem cell research projects, New York now ranks number two in stem cell research, second only to California.

Fovea Raises $44M/Receives Orphan Drug Designation from the European Commission

Fovea Pharmaceuticals, with US offices in New York City, raised $44M in a Series B financing. The company also announced that its product, Recombinant human rod-derived cone viability factor (rh-RdCVF), received designation as Orphan Medicinal Product from the European Commission. Fovea is focused on discovering, developing and commercializing innovative breakthrough drugs for the treatment of retinal diseases.

Ziopharm’s ZIO-201 Among 100 Greatest Investigational Drugs

New York City based ZIOPHARM Oncology, Inc. is a biopharmaceutical company engaged in the development and commercialization of cancer drugs to address unmet medical needs. ZIOPHARM recently received FDA orphan drug designation for Palifosfamide (ZIO-201) in the treatment of Soft Tissue Sarcoma. ZIO-201 was also recently honored as being one of the 100 Greatest Investigational Drugs by R&D Directions Magazine.

Target Health Inc., Passes Difficult FDA Audit With Flying Colors and No Form 483.

FDA just completed a 4 day, unannounced though not unexpected, inspection of Target Health Inc, a New York City e*CRO, for an NDA under review. For this program Target Health performed all of the clinical and regulatory strategic planning, toxicology, regulatory, study designs, monitoring of the clinical trials (Phase 1, 2 and 3), data management, including Target e*CRF® (EDC), statistics, medical writing and preparation of the NDA. There were 2 pivotal trials and a rescue protocol for treatment failures. The FDA audit also included a detailed review of Target e*CRF® and data management. The outcome of the inspection was one minor finding and 2 recommendations on improving 2 SOPs. No Form 483 was issued. www.targethealth.com – http://blog.targethealth.com

R & D Directions Presents

http://www.plexxikon.com/pdfs/R&D%20Directions_03-2008.pdf

100 Greatest Investigational Drugs

Novel compounds for unmet needs, head the list of potentially important Products

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In this Dec., 2006 photomicrograph released Thursday, May 29, 2008 by The Nakao Hamaguchi Laboratory of the University of Tokyo, a “carbon nanotube ramen” in a bowl with diameter measuring one-thousandth of a millimeter (one-25,000th of an inch) produced by the university’s mechanical engineering Prof. Masayuki Nakao and his students in a project aimed at developing nanotube-processing technology is shown. “We believe it’s the world’s smallest ramen bowl, with the smallest portion of noodles inside, though they’re not edible,” Nakao said. The microscopic bowl was first created in December 2006, but was only revealed Thursday after it was entered for a microphotography competition this month. (AP Photo/The Nakao Hamaguchi Laboratory of the University of Tokyo, HO)

Published: 2008-05-29, by AP – obtained from, http://www.southernledger.com

Location: TOKYO

(AP) Japanese scientists say they have used cutting-edge technology to create a noodle bowl so small it can be seen only through a microscope.

Mechanical engineering professor Masayuki Nakao said Thursday he and his students at the University of Tokyo used a carbon-based material to produce a noodle bowl with a diameter 1/25,000 of an inch in a project aimed at developing nanotube-processing technology.

The Japanese-style ramen bowl was carved out of microscopic nanotubes, Nakao said.

Nanotubes are tube-shaped pieces of carbon, measuring about one-ten-thousandth of the thickness of a human hair.

Carbon nanotubes are being explored for a wide range of uses in electronics and medicine because their structure endows them with powerful physical properties such as a strength greater than steel.

The ramen bowl experiment included a string of “noodles” that measured one-12,500th of an inch in length, with a thickness of one-1.25 millionth of an inch.

“We believe it’s the world’s smallest ramen bowl, with the smallest portion of noodles inside, though they are not edible,” Nakao said.

The hardest part was to keep the noodles from rising upright from the bowl “like alfalfa sprouts,” he said. “The achievement was mostly for fun.”

The microscopic bowl was first created in December 2006, but revealed only Thursday after it was entered for a microphotography competition last week.